Acme Cabinet Doors
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Glass Door

Shown in Cherry

Minimum Door Width: 6”
Minimum Door Length: 6”

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Suggested Drawer Front Options

Slab Drawer Front

Shown In Alder

Glass Cabinet Door

Note: Glass cabinet doors do not come with glass, glass is best obtained locally read here for more info.

Back side of glass doors are rabbeted to accept glass panel.

Profile shown below.

Poplar Frame/Poplar Panel

Poplar  wood is generally straight grained with a fine, even texture. Creamy-white to pale brown heartwood and sapwood. Poplar varies from white to a light green with occasional black and purple streaks. Poplar is a relatively hard hardwood with good durability. This door style has a solid poplar wood center panel.


Paint Grade Poplar Cabinet Doors

Stain Grade Cabinet Doors

Alder

Alder wood is straight grained and even textured. Pale yellow to reddish brown with indistinct boundary between heartwood and softwood. Alder is an excellent choice for staining, as it will take a clear coat, or a light to dark stain very well. Has also been used quite commonly to mimic the look of cherry if stained and finished properly. Since alder is a straight smooth grain wood it also takes painted finishes very well.


Ash

Ash wood is generally straight grained with a coarse texture. Pale-brown heartwood and almost white sapwood. Ash wood is a very hard and wear resistant hardwood. Ash does take stain well, but do to its rather coarse grain patterns it is not recommended for painting as this coarse grain will show under some painted finishes.


Beech

Beech wood is a very hard hardwood with excellent wear resistance with straight or sometimes interlocked grain with a fine, even texture. Dark to light reddish brown heartwood and very thin, nearly white sapwood. Beech wood stains well, but is seen often with a glazed finish, it is also another ideal paint grade material due to its hardness and wear resistance and smooth grain, it takes paint beautifully.

Pine-Clear

Clear Pine wood is straight grained, with a medium coarse texture. Clear Pine is free from any knots. Pine does stain well but it is recommended that a pre-stain conditioner or gel stain is used.

Knotty Alder

Knotty or sometimes called Rustic Alder wood is straight grained with some streaking and knots that create a rustic appearance. Pale yellow to reddish brown with indistinct boundary between heartwood and softwood. Knotty Alder is an excellent choice for staining, as it will take a clear coat, or a light to dark stain very well.

Red Oak-Plain Sawn

Red Oak wood is a straight grained with a coarse texture and prominent rays. Light reddish tan heartwood and narrow, almost white sapwood. Red Oak is a very hard and durable hardwood with great wear resistance. Oak accepts stain very well, from light to dark. Due to its rather coarse grain patterns Red Oak is not recommended for painting as this coarse grain will show under some painted finishes.

Red Oak-Rift Sawn

Red Oak Rift Sawn Red Oak Quarter Sawn wood is a straight grained with a coarse texture Light reddish tan heartwood and narrow, almost white sapwood. Red Oak is a very hard and durable hardwood with great wear resistance.  Oak accepts stain very well, from light to dark. Rift Sawn Red Oak is typically milled at a slight angle (30 to 60 degrees) from vertical producing a very straight grain pattern with almost no “ray-fleck” as would be found on quarter sawn material.

Sapele

Sapele wood is interlocked, sometimes wavy grain producing a distinctive figure on quartered surfaces. Medium texture, high luster, pale yellow sapwood and light red to dark reddish brown heartwood. Sapele can be stained although it is usually clear finished since it has a dark reddish brown appearance.

White Oak-Plain Sawn

White Oak is an outstanding domestic hardwood that is a very strong wood that displays a very straight and consistent grain. Its unique cellular structure makes the wood highly water resistant, and it is therefore used in great quantities for exterior applications from trim and general construction to furniture and garden structures.

White Oak-Rift Sawn

White Oak is an outstanding domestic hardwood that is a very strong wood that displays a very straight and consistent grain. Its unique cellular structure makes the wood highly water resistant, and it is therefore used in great quantities for exterior applications from trim and general construction to furniture and garden structures. Rift Sawn White Oak is also typically milled at a slight angle (30 to 60 degrees) from vertical producing a very straight grain pattern with almost no “ray-fleck” as would be found on quarter sawn material.




Red Oak-Quarter Sawn

Red Oak Quarter Sawn wood is a straight grained with a coarse texture Light reddish tan heartwood and narrow, almost white sapwood. Red Oak is a very hard and durable hardwood with great wear resistance. Oak accepts stain very well, from light to dark. Quarter Sawn material is milled so that the growth rings of the lumber are near vertical (60 to 90 degrees), the cuts made cuts across the wood's ray cells yielding "ray-flecked" grain.

Pine-Knotty

Knotty or sometimes called Rustic Pine wood is straight grained, sometimes with a bird's eye pattern, and with a medium coarse texture. Typically has prominent dark resin duct lines and numerous small but sound knots. Light reddish brown heartwood and wide, nearly white to pale yellow sapwood. Knotty Pine does stain well but it is recommended that a pre-stain conditioner or gel stain is used.

Vertical Grain Fir

Vertical Grain Fir, known for its excellent dimensional stability, and its close grain. Vertical grain is created when lumber is sawn across the annual growth rings, resulting in a straight, vertical grain pattern and smooth surface. The growth rings reflect the growth rate of the individual tree, so the width and spacing of the grain pattern will be slightly different on each piece of wood.

White Oak-Quarter  Sawn

The characteristic that has made White Oak famous is the presence of striking medullary rays that appear when the wood is quartersawn. Quartersawn White Oak is a highly stable material. In the early 1900s White Oak was the standard species for the arts and crafts movement in furniture building.


Maple

Maple is a very hard hardwood, with excellent wear resistance. Maple wood has a straight, close grain with a fine, uniform texture. Nearly white sapwood, sometimes with a reddish tinge and light tannish heartwood. Maple is very hard and can be stained, although it is seen with a glazed finish. Maple paints excellently and is a great choice for a durable material for painting.

Lyptus

Lyptus derives from fast-growing eucalyptus trees cultivated on well-managed plantations and harvested to sustainable certification standards, making it an environmentally-responsible hardwood.


Hickory

Hickory is a very hard hardwood with tight, generally straight grain with a coarse texture. Pale to reddish brown heartwood and whitish sapwood. Hickory can be stained and finishes well, but do to its rather coarse grain patterns it is not recommended for painting as this coarse grain will show under some painted finishes.


Cherry

Cherry wood is a relatively hard hardwood with great wear resistance. Cherry is generally straight grained with a fairly uniform texture and a rich luster. Light to dark reddish brown heartwood and narrow, nearly white sapwood. Cherry takes stain very well and is regarded as one of the most highly prized cabinet woods in North America.


Birch-White

White Birch is a relatively hard hardwood with good wear resistance. White Birch is Straight grained with a fine even texture. White Birch has a similar color tone to that of maple. Birch is an all around good wood, stains relatively well also commonly seen with a glaze finish or more popularly clear finishes. Because Birch has a smooth grain it also is an excellent choice for painted finishes where a hard durable material is needed.

Birch-Red

Red Birch is a relatively hard hardwood with good wear resistance. Red Birch is Straight grained with a fine even texture. Red Birch has quite a reddish appearance similar to that of cherry. Birch is an all around good wood, stains relatively well also commonly seen with a glaze finish or more popularly clear finishes. Because Birch has a smooth grain it also is an excellent choice for painted finishes where a hard durable material is needed.

Walnut

Walnut wood is generally straight grained with a moderately coarse, uniform texture. Rich dark brown heartwood and nearly white sapwood. Prized in North America for high-end cabinetry and furniture. Walnut stains very well. Walnut can be painted but it does have a rather coarse grain pattern that would not be recommended for painted surfaces that require a smooth finish. Due to its cost and its natural beauty it is rarely painted.


Birch-Natural

Birch is a relatively hard hardwood with good wear resistance. Birch is Straight grained with a fine even texture. Reddish brown heartwood and light-yellow sapwood. Birch is an all around good wood, stains relatively well also commonly seen with a glaze finish or more popularly clear finishes. Because Birch has a smooth grain it also is an excellent choice for painted finishes where a hard durable material is needed.

Price Per Sq Foot

$8.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$21.58

Primered

Primer Info

$26.99

Painted

Paint Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$11.95

Door Info

Unfinished

$29.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$11.95

Door Info

Unfinished

$29.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$11.95

Door Info

Unfinished

$29.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$13.95

Door Info

Unfinished

$31.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$16.95

Door Info

Unfinished

$34.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$16.95

Door Info

Unfinished

$34.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$16.95

Door Info

Unfinished

$34.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$15.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$33.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$17.70

Door Info

Unfinished

$35.70

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$16.19

Door Info

Unfinished

$34.19

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$12.95

Door Info

Unfinished

$30.95

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$17.00

Door Info

Unfinished

$35.00

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$21.56

Door Info

Unfinished

$39.56

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$11.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$29.99

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$14.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$32.99

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$14.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$32.99

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$18.20

Door Info

Unfinished

$36.20

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$20.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$38.99

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$17.33

Door Info

Unfinished

$35.33

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$12.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$21.58

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$14.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$32.99

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Price Per Sq Foot

$14.99

Door Info

Unfinished

$32.99

Clear Finish

Finish Info

Glass For Kitchen Cabinet Doors Can Look Fantastic

Are you tired of the same old block of wood for cabinet doors? Do you want to have something that is just that little bit different, but still looks fantastic? If you answer yes to either of those questions, then it may be worth your while considering using glass for kitchen cabinet doors because there is no doubt that when it is done correctly it really can look stunning.

Why it is a good idea

Using glass for kitchen cabinet doors allows you to get that happy medium between having a solid wooden door and completely open shelving. Thanks to the glass you can see inside without it being left open to the elements and when done correctly there is no doubt that it can look amazing. Obviously because you have still sealed everything in it does mean that there will be no need to worry about dust or debris accumulating on the different items, but at the same time it does allow you to potentially show off what is inside, but only if you dress it correctly and also use the correct lighting to maximize the effect.

The lighting aspect

In order to have everything looking amazing it is always a good idea to be clever with the lighting in the cabinets and ideally you should consider using soft lighting that gives off quite a warm glow. It is also advisable to use soft spotlights built into the shelf above as this will highlight the items in the cabinet without the light itself being too intrusive. This will then create a number of shadows in the cabinet and overall it can make everything look so much better and bring your kitchen to life simply by having glass in your cabinet doors.

Is it modern or traditional?

Some people may worry about whether this is a modern approach to the kitchen or if it is actually quite traditional. In all honesty it does depend on the style of the cabinet door as well as the glass itself, but it is capable of working in every type of kitchen from plain to those that are going for a classier look. The glass can be just plain, you may have some lead work on it to break it up, there could be designs on it, and there are a whole host of other options out there that helps to ensure that you can use glass in your kitchen no matter the end result you are hoping to achieve.

What are the advantages?

There are a number of advantages of using glass for kitchen cabinet doors and some of them have already been discussed above. There is no doubt that glass really does open up your kitchen and it does make it look rather classy when it is done correctly. Glass allows light to bounce across the room, making it feel more spacious than it ever has done before. Glass also breaks up the monotony of solid wood as you can have glass in only those doors that are higher up on the wall rather than those at floor level. Finally, it just looks different to the norm as a smaller percentage of people actually have this type of door in their kitchen.

Are there any disadvantages?

The only disadvantages of using glass in kitchens is that you will need to work at keeping it clean especially if it is near your cooker and is constantly being splashed. However, with the correct glass cleaner, and a bit of elbow grease on your part, this should not really pose too big a problem. The only other disadvantage is that it does mean that you need to keep the inside of your cupboards as clean as possible due to the fact that people can see inside at all times. Keep those groceries lined up perfectly, make sure that those dishes are neat at all times as people will notice it and it does actually ruin the way that your kitchen looks.

The types of glass doors available

Finally, it is worth quickly discussing the different glass kitchen cabinet doors available for your home as there are several types to take into consideration before you go ahead and buy any.

First, do you want just one solid panel of glass covering the entire door, apart from the wooden frame, or do you want it broken up into more of a lattice pattern resulting in smaller piece of glass? This can depend on the overall look you are trying to achieve with your kitchen as the smaller pieces of glass are perhaps slightly more traditional and classy whereas the single piece opens up the room a lot better. There is a third option available to you and that is to use frosted glass, but that does lend itself more towards the most modern of styles where there is not even a wooden frame to the door, but instead uses chrome hinges and handles to complete the look. If you do not like the frosted idea, then how about etched or textured glass that will still allow that light to bounce around the room, but at least offers some kind of privacy to the items inside your cabinets.

Lead on the glass is another option if you are looking for something classy or traditional, but do note that this type of glass can often be the most expensive purely because of the work that has to go into its production. There are a number of designs available with this type of door, so once again do think about the end look you are hoping to achieve before settling on the one you wish to buy.

In short, glass for kitchen cabinet doors really can work as long as you choose the correct style for your kitchen and also consider using the appropriate lighting in order to create that perfect atmosphere. Do not worry about it being modern or traditional as the main thing is that it looks good and when you look at some of the examples that are readily available you should see that it can also work for you and your very own kitchen. Think carefully about the style of glass you prefer more than the actual frames as it is easier to get the wood to match than the other way around. Look at a number of examples and picture it in your kitchen and you should ultimately end up more than happy with how your glass cabinet doors turn out.